Posts tagged ‘rings’

Peacocking and Weaseling


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Peacocking and weaseling may sound like strange terms when we’re talking about writing, but they should be understood if you’re on a quest to become a better writer.

Peacock and weasel terms are difficult to avoid, but once you learn what they are, and why they should be avoided, you’ll be able to spot them in your own writing.

PEACOCK TERMS

Peacock terms promote a subject without providing attribution and they are often used to grab a reader’s attention, but typically reflect an unqualified opinion.

Examples:

  • one of the most important
  • one of the best
  • the indisputable
  • outstanding
  • among the most notable

WEASEL TERMS

Like peacock terms, weasel words and phrases aim to create an impression that the writer wrote something meaningful and specific, when in fact only vague, general, and ambiguous information was claimed.

Weasel terms tend to promote the thought that something is widely accepted, whether it is or isn’t. Weasels are clever and guile mammals — so are weasel words. In fact, weasels are so sneaky, that their often mistaken for a rodent, rather than a mammal.

Examples:

  • Studies show… (What studies?)
  • Some argue…(Who argues?)
  • Critics say…(Ok, what critics?)
  • Is considered by many… (Great, but who?)

Peacock and weasel terms are difficult to avoid, but once you learn what they are, and why they should be avoided, you’ll be able to spot them in your own writing.

Read more at http://www.writeraccess.com/blog/avoiding-peacock-and-weasel-terms/

Peacock: O-H  M-Y  G-O-D!! See how your fur shines, it is as though you’ve diamonds embedded onto your body!

Weasel: Yeah~ I get that a lot from many other animals too…

Have fun reading!!

Till then,

Cheers & TTFN~ 😀

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Let The Roses Rise (Part 2)


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As I don’t have any more rose design accessory at hand, I’ve upload the design ‘Rustic Petals’  instead. Before I continue with the next six months for the birthday flowers, I shall share with you some information concerning petals.

Flowers have long been a symbol of femininity and women. Flower petals can be used for this effect and they can show the beauty and innocence of youth, and the fleetingness of it.

These are the types of themes that flower petals can be used to emphasize:

  • The coming of spring.
  • Watching young girls fully bloom into womanhood.
  • A newly found love or romance.
  • A maturation of love.
  • Trying to capture such an event as it happens.

Lastly they can also show a loss of innocence for a girl.  This can be done through the flowers being broken or crushed, or by having broken flowers in the background after an event for the girl.

Rose petals are associated with the birth of the Indian goddess Lakshmi, claimed to be the most beautiful woman in India. She was supposedly born from 108 large and 1,008 small rose petals.

The number of petals on a rose have come to symbolize different things:

  • The wild rose has five petals, signifying the wounds of Christ.
  • A rose with seven petals signifies seven directions of space, seven degrees of perfection, and seven planets (when it was believed there were seven planets in the solar system).
  • A rose with eight petals is a message of rebirth and renewal.

Read more at:

http://www.three-musketeers.net/mike/flowers.html

http://www.ehow.com/about_6610717_symbolism-rose-petals.html

http://rosefarm.typepad.com/blog/2011/07/more-rose-number-symbolism-1.html

Without further adieu, here are the roses/item related for the next six months:

Crown of Roses (5th July)

The word Rosary means ‘Crown of Roses’ that is to say that every time people pray the Rosary devoutly they place a crown of 153 red roses and 16 white roses upon the heads of Jesus and Mary. Being heavenly flowers these roses will never fade or lose their exquisite beauty.

There are differing views on the history of the rosary.  According to tradition, the concept of the rosary was given to Saint Dominic in an apparition by the Virgin Mary in the year 1214 in the church of Prouille.

In the 15th century it was promoted by Alanus de Rupe (aka Alain de la Roche or Saint Alan of the Rock), a learned Dominican priest and theologian, who established the “15 rosary promises” and started many rosary confraternities.

However, most scholarly research suggests a more gradual and organic development of the rosary. From the 16th to the early 20th century, the structure of the rosary remained essentially unchanged.

Read more at:

 http://eternalcrownofroses.blogspot.sg/ 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosary

White Rose Bud (6th July), Red Rose Bud (7th July)

A rose bud is the bud of a rose (seriously…why do I want to type this out?) and literary a pretty young woman.

Rose petals and rosebud pieces are most commonly harvested while they are still buds in an adolescent growth stage. This preserves full flavor during the processing of the plant. Rosebud and rose petal tea has been used as a part of Chinese medicine for more than 4,000 years.

Read more at www.livestrong.com

White Rose (8th July)

White roses are the ultimate symbol of purity and innocence. There are plenty of myths and legends behind the white rose.

As one myth has it, the first rose on Earth was a white rose, and it miraculously transformed to other hues. The pure white rose was said to have been tainted by blood, making it red; and it was also made to blush from a kiss, making it pink.

Another myth came from the Ancient Greeks. It was said that roses were originally white until one day Aphrodite the Goddess of Love and Beauty pricked herself with the thorns of a rose. The blood that dripped from her finger turned the white roses red.

These myths indicate the loss of innocence, which is the absolute opposite of what the white rose symbolizes – innocence and purity.

Read more at Significance of  White Roses

Rosea Canina (9th July)

Rosa canina (commonly known as the dog rose) is a variable climbing wild rose species native to Europe, northwest Africa and western Asia.

The plant is high in certain antioxidants. The fruit is noted for its high vitamin C level and is used to make syrup, tea and marmalade. It has been grown or encouraged in the wild for the production of vitamin C, from its fruit (often as rose-hip syrup), especially during conditions of scarcity or during wartime.

The botanic name is derived from the common names ‘dog rose’ or similar in several European languages. It is sometimes considered that the word ‘dog’ has a disparaging meaning in this context, indicating ‘worthless’.

However it also known that it was used in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to treat the bite of rabid dogs, hence the name “dog rose” may result from this.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_canina

Burgundy rose (1st August)

The symbolic meaning of a burgundy rose is ‘unconscious beauty’.

The best answer selected in the answers.yahoo.com pertaining to the meaning of unconscious beauty –  beauty that is unrecognised by his/her owner,  it can also mean that sometimes you won’t recognize the beauty at first glance but you have to look a little deeper for it.

What should I do when there isn’t much information on the topic? I share a poem…hehehe…so here’s a poem ‘Unconscious Came a Beauty’ by May Swenson:

      Unconscious came a beauty

to my wrist and stopped my pencil

 merged its shadow profile with my hand’s ghost on the page

Red Spotted Purple or else Mourning Cloak

paired thin-as-paper wings, near black

were edged on the seam side poppy orange

  as were its spots

I sat arrested

for its soot-haired body’s worm shone in the sun

 It bent its tongue long as a leg

 black on my skin

and clung without my feeling

while its tomb-stained

duplicate parts of a window opened

And then I moved

Are you able to guess what insect is she describing? Do take a look at this page and let me know.

Damask Rose (2nd August)

The Damascus rose (Damask Rose), or sometimes as the Rose of Castile, is a rose hybrid, derived from Rosa gallica and Rosa moschata. Of the old European roses, the Damask is one of the most enchanting, the family of foliage and fragrance.

This family, with origins going back to pre-christian times probably originated in Persia, and was brought to Europe by the crusaders. By the 14th century the Damask rose had arrived in France, where it would have received considerable attention.

For centuries, the Damascus rose (Rosa damascena) has been considered a symbol of beauty and love. Today, the majority of our rose fragrance still comes from R. Damascena Trigintipetala, the Kazanlik rose. It is still grown extensively in Bulgaria.

You’ll need 3 tonnes of petals (1.2 million blooms) to distill 1kg of attar, the foundation of rose perfume. Worse still, you must harvest it in the short summer flowering season and then only in the early morning before the heat of the sun has diminished the fragrance.

Damascus roses are used in cooking as a flavouring ingredient or spice. Rose water is often sprinkled on many meat dishes, while rose powder is added to sauces. The most popular use, however, is in the flavoring of desserts such as ice cream, jam, Turkish delights, rice pudding, yogurt and etc.

Read more at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_damascena

http://www.netlist.co.nz/gardens/rosegarden/rgjulydamask.htm

Moss Rose (3rd August)

Moss Rose is a flowering plant in the family Portulacaceae, native to Argentina, southern Brazil, and Uruguay.  It is also seen in the South Asia and widely spread in most of the cities with old 18th-19th century architecture in the Balkans.

In Bangladesh, it is referred to as the “Time Flower” because the flower has a specific time to bloom while in Vietnam, it is also known as the “Ten o’clock flower”, because the flower is usually in full bloom at 10 o’clock in the morning.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moss-rose_Purslane

The Moss Rose is also a multi-purpose stadium in Macclesfield, England. It is currently used mostly for football matches and is the home ground of Macclesfield Town F.C.. The stadium holds 6,355 and was built in 1891, which until Macclesfield’s relegation in 2012 made it the second oldest in the Football League.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moss_Rose

Hundred-leaved Rose (5th August 2012)

The Hundred-Leaved Rose, also known as the Provence or Cabbage Rose is a complex hybrid rose developed by  Dutch rose breeders in the period between the 17th century and the 19th century, possibly earlier.

The flowers are round and globular, with numerous thin overlapping petals that are highly scented; they are usually pink, less often white to dark red-purple.

It is widely cultivated for its singular fragrance—clear and sweet, with light notes of honey. The flowers are commercially harvested for the production of rose oil, which is commonly used in perfumery.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_%C3%97_centifolia

Mundi Rose (12th September)

Rosa Mundi (Mundi Rose) was first described in 1583, and according to ‘The Garden Book’ of Sir Thomas Hanmer (published in Eng­land in 1659) it was originally found in Norfolk ‘..upon a branch of the common red rose…’ .

However there is an earlier legend which states that the ‘Rosa Mundi’ was named after Rosa­mund Clifford (also known as “The Rose of the World), a long-time mistress of King Henry II who reigned as England’s monarch from 1154 to 1189.

A large specimen of ‘Rosa Mundi’ is still a stunning sight in the height of summer and its semi-double flowers are among the largest of all the old fashioned roses.

It is the oldest of the all striped varieties grown today, and because of it natural disease resistance it has lasted well through the centuries.

Read more: http://gardenofeaden.blogspot.com/2009/04/historic-roses-rosa-mundi.html#ixzz26GHMftaY

Red Rose (13th September)

The primary significance of a red rose is love and romance; it not only carries more meaning than many other color roses, it is also one of the most universal of all symbols.

They have appeared throughout history and across many cultures as political and religious symbols. The mystique of the red rose has been a source of immeasurable inspiration for many throughout the ages.

The modern red rose we are now familiar with was introduced to Europe from China in the 1800’s. The color red itself evolved from an early primal symbol for life into a metaphor for deep emotion.

In Greek and Roman mythology the red rose was closely tied to the goddess of love. Many early cultures used red roses to decorate marriage ceremonies and they were often a part of traditional wedding attire. Through this practice, the red rose became known as a symbol for love and fidelity.

Red roses continue to be the most popular way to say “I love you” to someone special. The rich heritage of the red rose has culminated in its modern day image as the lover’s rose. They are the definitive symbol for romantic sentiments, representing true love, stronger than thorns.

Read more at http://www.proflowers.com/flowerguide/rosemeanings/redrose-meanings.aspx

China Rose (14th September)

The China Rose is an evergreen flowering shrubnative to East Asia. It is widely grown as an ornamental plant throughout the tropics and subtropics. The flowers are large, generally red in the original varieties, and firm, but generally lack any scent.

Despite their size and red hues attractive to nectar-feeding birds, they are not visited regularly by hummingbirds when grown in the Neotropics.

The flowers themselves are edible and are used in salads in the Pacific Islands. The flowers are used to shine shoes in parts of India.

It is also a pH indicator.China rose indicator turns acidic solutions to magenta/dark pink and basic solutions to green. It is also used for the worship of Devi and especially the red variety takes an important part in tantra.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_Hibiscus

Austrian Rose (19th September)

I cannot find any information about Austrian Rose, but one Austrian Copper Rose. Hmm…not sure if it is the same flower but here are some information on this flower.

Austrian copper rose (Rosa Foetida) is a species of rose, native to the foothills of the Caucasus Mountains in Georgia.

The rose is named for its smell–foetida is Latin for “having a bad smell” which is reminiscent of boiled linseed oil, a smell which some find objectionable

Since there were no yellow roses native to Europe, its introduction from Persia was an important addition to the cultivation of roses, and R. foetida is now an important contributor to the stock of cultivated roses.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_foetida

Rose Campion (20th September)

Rose Campion is a stunning combination of magenta blooms with a soft silverish foliage. It is considered a short-lived perennial that will grow well in Zones 3 to 9 in a sunny or lightly shaded location.

It’s been cultivated since the 1300’s, possibly earlier. In Catholic literature it is referred to as “Our Lady’s Rose”, possibly because of the heart shaped petals.

Rose Campion can be used as a cut flower if you harvest the stems when just one or two of the flowers are open. They will last about a week in a vase.

Read more at http://oldfashionedliving.com/campion.html

Rose Acacia (15th October)

Rose Acacia is a plant many people are unfamiliar with and are asking what it is.  Other common names for Rose Acacia include hairy or bristly locust. This is because the stems are covered with soft bristles. It can set multiple clusters of flowers on each stem resulting in an extended bloom time.

The flowers are pink, produced on short racemes of 3-12 together in the spring; each flower is 20–25 mm (about 1 inch) across. It is an easy to grow plant because of its tolerance to poor soil and drought. Often it is seen growing on old farmsteads or along the roadside.

The plant habit is somewhat open and airy because of coarse stems and its compound leaves. Young shoots can easily be pulled if one is persistent, but if cultivated it is best to place it in a confined area or area where it can be permitted to spread.

Read more at http://blog.lib.umn.edu/efans/ygnews/2009/07/rose_acacia_-_a_shrub_with_sho.html

Guelder Rose (29th October)

Guelder Rose is a species of Viburnum, native to Europe and Asia. The name Guelder comes from Gueldersland, a Dutch province, where the tree was first cultivated.

It was introduced into England under the name of ‘Gueldres Rose.’ The garden variety, Viburnum sterile, with snowball flowers, does not produce the showy fruit of the wild species.

The leaves are superficially similar to the leaves of some maples, most easily distinguished by their somewhat wrinkled surface with impressed leaf venation.

The berries have anti-scorbutic properties. They turn black in drying and have been used for making ink. It can be edible in small quantities, with a very acidic taste; it can be used to make jelly. It is however very mildly toxic, and may cause vomiting or diarrhea if eaten in large amounts

The wood, like that of the Spindle Tree and Dogwood, is used for making skewers.

Read more at

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viburnum_opulus

http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/g/gueros44.html

Daily Rose (4th December)

Aww…this is a difficult one. 😦

Been searching around and all I’ve found is a blog with this name and an album with this name in year 2004 by Stefanie Schlesinger.

I was not able to find the song clip for ‘Daily Rose’ in YouTube. The second song in this album is ‘My Funny Valentine’, which is not available in YouTube as well.

Since rose is closely related to valentine, I’ve decided  to share a piano piece having the same name with you all:

Hope you will enjoy this piece as much as I do. 😀

Lancaster’s Red Rose (5th December)

The final rose of the year

Lancaster’s Red Rose (also known as Old Red Damask and Rose of Provins) was introduced officially in Europe during the XIII century, brought from Persia; but was probably in Europe before that, since it shows up in ancient Roman frescoes.

The rose grew wild throughout Central Asia and can be found nowadays in the wild around Morocco, Andalusia, the Middle East and the Caucasus. These roses are shrubs and are also included on what is referred as old garden roses (OGR), Heritage or Antiques.

The Red Rose was the symbol of Lancastrian supporters who opposed the rival House of York, whose symbol was the White Rose of York. Both houses were branches of the Plantagenet royal house, tracing their descent from King Edward III (1312 – 1377).

The rivalry between the factions identified by the White Rose of York and the Red Rose of Lancaster started in 1399 when King Richard II (1377-1399) was overthrown by his cousin, Henry Bolingbroke, the Duke of Lancaster.

From the nineteenth century the red rose was part of the badge of a number of units of the British Army recruiting in the county. The rose was also appreciated for its medical value and was utilized in countless medical remedies.

Read more at

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Rose_of_Lancaster

http://www.the-tudors.org.uk/red-rose-lancaster.htm

Roses are red

Violets are blue

Sugar is sweet and so are you 

May all sweet and lovely souls out there enjoy reading these lovely and rosy information.

Till then,

Cheers & TTFN~ 😀

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Can I change?


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“A leopard cannot change its spots.”

I guess this is a very common phrase so decided to share with you all a cute comic found at ChineseEnglish.com:

If we don’t change, we don’t grow.

If we don’t grow, we aren’t really living.

Gail Sheehy

Have fun reading~

Till then,

Cheers & TTFN~ 😀

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Set Fire To The Rain


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A punk is a smoldering stick used for lighting firework fuses. It is safer than a match or a lighter because it can be used from a greater distance and does not use an open flame. They are made of bamboo and a brown coating of dried manure or compressed sawdust.

Punks often resemble sticks of incense, and in some countries actual incense sticks are used in a similar fashion.

Since incense is mentioned, here’s some information about this item as well:

The term incense refers to the substance itself, rather than to the odour that it produces. It was used by Chinese cultures from Neolithic times and became more widespread in the Xia, Shang, and Zhou dynasties.

The earliest recorded use of incense comes from the ancient Chinese, who used incense from herbs and plant products (such as cassia, cinnamon, styrax,sandalwood, amongst others) during the rites of formal ceremonies. Eventually, the Hindus adopted the use of incense from the Chinese, but they were the first to also use roots for incense.

Incense was used by the ancient Egyptians, not only to counteract unpleasant odours, but also to drive away demons and please the gods.

At around 2000 BC, Ancient China was the first civilization who began the use of incense in the religious sense, namely for worship.

The Babylonians used incense while offering prayers to divining oracles.  Incense spread from there to Greece and Rome.

Brought to Japan in the 6th century by Korean Buddhist monks, who used the mystical aromas in their purification rites, the delicate scents of Koh (high-quality Japanese incense) became a source of amusement and entertainment with nobles in the Imperial Court during the Heian Era200 years later.

During the 14th century Shogunate, a samurai warrior might perfume his helmet and armor with incense to achieve an aura of invincibility (as well as to make a noble gesture to whomever might take his head in battle).

It wasn’t until the Muromachi Era during the 15th and 16th century that incense appreciation spread to the upper and middle classes of Japanese society.

Read more at  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incense 

Got to know this song from my baby sis.  Fireworks kind of reminded me of fire raining from the sky and thus sharing this song with you all.

Have fun reading and listening~

Cheers & TTFN~

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Let’s Sub It!


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“Punk is not just the sound, the music. Punk is a life-style”

Billy Joe Armstrong

This quote is taken from an interview Billy Joe Armstrong (Green Day) had with NY Rock in April 1998.

As early as 1950, David Riesman distinguished between a majority, “which passively accepted commercially provided styles and meanings” and a ‘subculture’ “which actively sought a minority style ..”

The study of subcultures often consists of the study of symbolism attached to clothing, music and other visible affectations by members of subcultures. It may be difficult to identify certain subcultures because their style (particularly clothing and music) may be adopted by mass culture for commercial purposes.

Music-based subcultures are particularly vulnerable to this process, and so what may be considered a subculture at one stage in its history—such as jazz, goth, punk, hip hop andrave cultures—may represent mainstream taste within a short period of time.

Punks can come from any and all walks of life and economic classes. The punk subculture emerged in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia in the mid-1970s.

Early punk had an abundance of antecedents and influences. In particular, punk drew inspiration from several strains of modern art. The punk subculture is centered around listening to recordings or live concerts of a loud, aggressive genre of rock music called punk rock, usually shortened to punk.

The earliest form of punk rock, named protopunk in retrospect, started as a garage rock revival in the northeastern United States in the late 1960s.

In the United States during the early 1980s, punk underwent a renaissance in the form of hardcore punk, which sought to do away with the frivolities introduced in the later years of the original movement, while at the same time Britain saw a parallel movement called streetpunk.

Read more at 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subculture

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punk_subculture

A punk lifestyle I might not be able to lead, why not a little punk humour to share instead:

Have fun reading!

Cheers & TTFN~

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The Love We Put In That Action…


Just seven days ago was the beginning of the lunar seventh month

The Hungry Ghost Festival

A traditional Chinese festival and holiday (not in Singapore 😦 ) celebrated by Chinese in many countries.

BUT NO…THIS IS NOT GOING TO BE A POST WITH SOME CREEPY GHOST STORIES OR PARANORMAL ENCOUNTERS.

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LOVE IS IN THE AIR BECAUSE TODAY IS THE 7TH DAY OF THE LUNAR 7TH MONTH

A day to remember the tale of a forbidden and yet undying love between two lovers – A celestial being and a human being.

Niulang And Zhinu (Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

Qixi Festival also known as the Chinese Valentine’s Dayis a Chinese festival that celebrates the annual meeting of the cowherd and weaver girl in Chinese mythology.

The general tale is about a love story between the weaver girl (one of the seven celestial maidens), symbolizing Vega and the young cowherd, symbolizing Altair.

Their love was not allowed, thus they were banished to opposite sides of the Silver River (symbolizing the Milky Way). Once a year, on the 7th day of the 7th lunar month, a flock of magpies would form a bridge to reunite the lovers for one day.

This is an important festival, especially for young girls. During the festival, girls make a display of their domestic skills and make wishes  for marrying someone who would be a good and loving husband.

Traditionally, there would be contests among young girls who attempted to be the best in threading needles under low-light conditions like the glow of ember or a half moon. Today, girls sometimes gather toiletries in honour of the seven maidens.

The festival also held an importance for newly-wed couples. The celebration stood symbol for a happy marriage and showed that the married woman was treasured by her new family.

Read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qixi_Festival

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Japanese woodblock print of Tanabata festivities in Edo (Tokyo), 1852, by Hiroshige (Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

Tanabata (meaning “Evening of the seventh”) is a Japanese star festival, originating from the Chinese Qixi Festival which was imported to Japan by the Empress Kōken in 755.

It gained widespread popularity among the general public by the early Edo period. Like Qixi, Tanabata was inspired by the famous Chinese folklore story, “The Weaver Girl and the Cowherd” and the most popular version is as follows:

Orihime (The Weaving Princess), daughter of the Tentei (Sky King), wove beautiful clothes by the bank of the Amanogawa ( Milky Way). Her father loved the cloth that she wove and so she worked very hard every day to weave it.

Being concerned about his daughter who was too busy to find her true love, Tentei arranged for her to meet Hikoboshi (Cow Herder Star) who lived and worked on the other side of the Amanogawa.

When the two met, they fell instantly in love with each other and married shortly thereafter. However, once married, Orihime no longer would weave cloth for Tentei and Hikoboshi allowed his cows to stray all over Heaven.

In anger, Tentei separated the two lovers across the Amanogawa and forbade them to meet but later gave in to his daughter’s persistent pleading.

The two can only meet on the 7th day of the 7th month if she worked hard and finished her weaving. It is said that if it rains on Tanabata, the magpies cannot come and the two lovers must wait until another year to meet.

In present-day Japan, people generally celebrate this day by writing wishes, sometimes in the form of poetry, on small pieces of paper, and hanging them on bamboo, sometimes with other decorations (see also Wish Tree). The bamboo and decorations are often set afloat on a river or burned after the festival, around midnight or on the next day

Popular customs relating to the festival varied by region of the country, but generally, girls wished for better sewing and craftsmanship, and boys wished for better handwriting.

Read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanabata

13082013 - Let Us Always MeetSo, do smile often and who knows you might just find that special someone who would take your breath away (well, of course in a good and lovingly way…hehhee).

Before ending this post, let us share a lovely P.O.V. contribution about family love by Yuna:

Let's Play - Home Sweet Home 6 - Yuna

Let's Play - Home Sweet Home

 A big thank you to Yuna for joining in the fun and sharing her love with us.

ヽ(´▽`)/ 

We do look forward to receive more lovely contributions from all lovely souls out there soon!

Love begins at home, and it is not how much we do… but how much love we put in that action.

Mother Teresa 

So, may it be towards a sweet heart or a loved one, start injecting tons and tons of love into your actions now!

Have a great Valentine’s Day (Chinese or Japanese Style) ahead!

Till then,

Cheers & TTFN~ 😀

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Credits: Some cute and lovely pictures found in this post are downloaded from FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Belt Problems


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What Is The Definition Of The Belt Problem?

Definition provided by Wikipedia:

The Belt Problem – Provided By Wikipedia

The belt problem is a mathematics problem which requires finding the length of a crossed belt that connects two circular pulleys with radius r1 and r2 whose centers are separated by a distance P (see above diagram).

What Is The Solution For The Belt Problem?

Solution provided by Wikipedia:

The solution of the belt problem requires trigonometry and the concepts of the bi-tangent line, the vertical angle, and congruent angles.

What Is The Definition Of MY Belt Problem?

Definition provided by Yours Truly:

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My belt problem is an over-eating problem which usually happens during festive seasons; resulting in the circumference increment of a part of the abdomen between the rib cage and hips (See above diagram).

What Is The Solution For My Belt Problem?

Solution provided by Yours Truly:

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A NEW BELT

How time flies, tomorrow will be the 15th day of our Chinese New Year, which is also the last day of the festive season.

May you lovely souls out there have fun reading this post!

Till then,

Have a wonderful Sunday ahead!

Cheers & TTFN~

Credits: Some Pictures found in this post are downloaded from FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Your Favourite Christmas Song – Wrapping Up


How can we miss out ‘Silent Night’ on a Christmas eve?

This is exactly why we are glad that it is Beautyofsimplycity‘s favourite Christmas song and she is sporting enough to respond even though she doesn’t celebrate Christmas in her country — see, that is the true spirit of sharing!!

With this song, we are actually wrapping up the ‘What is Your Favourite Christmas Song‘ thingy.

It is really fun posting all the songs because we’ve never expected any respond in the first place and once again we would like to thank the following lovely souls for enriching this humble blog of ours for responding:

littlepoppits fun ideas for you and your poppits

Fashion Mayan

chocolatelady555 ~ love bites from the chocolate lady

egghead23 ~ thoughts about the book on my shelf

Dieu, Obviously ~ the home of vintage, homemade and organic gigs

rabbitcancook ~ a recipe of sharing & bento blog

gatesitter

ilovecolorblocks

Bridgitte Raven

findthedetails ~ interiors news and finishing touches for homes

K ~ wondering, musings, motherhood and more…

Teasa Williams

beautyofsimplycity ~ Words, pictures, drawings -randomness anyone?

Of course, we would like to give a BIG BIG THANKS for all those lovely souls who had liked and commented on these posts!! 😀

For those lovely souls who have just stumbled upon this post and not wanting to miss out any fun, here are the links of our ‘Your Favourite Christmas Song‘ links:

What’s Your Favourite Christmas Song?

Your Favourite Christmas Song – Part 1

Your Favourite Christmas Song – Part 2

Our Facebook Page + Your Favourite Christmas Song – Part 3

Grow Your Moustache and Grow Your Heart 

(Including Part 4 of Your Favourite Christmas Song)

Your Favourite Christmas Song – Part 5

More Sharing + Your Favourite Christmas Song – Part 6

The Reason Behind Your Smile + Your Favourite Christmas Song Part 7

Here are the jewelry pieces featured in some of the mentioned posts:

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We do hope there will be more of these interactions in the near future and without you lovely souls out there, we won’t be here doing this post.

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A BIG BIG CHRISTMAS-TY MUAHKKK TO YOU ALL~

Before ending this post, I would like to say:

MY FAVOURITE CHRISTMAS SONG IS…

Merry Christmas in advance

Till then,

Have a good Monday & Cheers!! 😀

Our Fimo Nail Art Decor

Handcraft Jewelry Banner

Which Turkey Is Older?


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Since it is already the season of thanksgiving, we’ve decided to do a post related to the big bird, Turkey.

Alas, we’ve no jewelry pieces with a turkey design (hmmm…would you wear one if there is any??? I wonder…) so we’ve chosen another bunch of flowers, with each little flower representing the heart of each thankful soul out there.

Hope you all will like it.

Turkey, known officially as the Republic of Turkey, is a Eurasian country located in Western Asia and in East Thrace in Southeastern Europe. The history of Turkey begins with the migration of Oghuz Turks into Anatolia in the context of the larger Turkic expansion, forming the Seljuq Empire in the 11th century AD.

The country’s official language is Turkish, which is spoken by approximately 85% of the population as mother tongue. The most numerous ethnic group are Turks, who constitute between 70% and 75% of the population according to the World Factbook. 

The name of Turkey, literally meaning “owner”, “land of” or “related to” and a Turk can mean either “a citizen of the modern state of Turkey” or more broadly, “an individual of the Turkic-speaking people.”

When Europeans first encountered this big bird in America, they incorrectly identified the birds as a type of guinea fowl which were also known as turkey fowl (or turkey hen and turkey cock) because they were imported to Central Europe through Turkey.

The name turkey fowl, shortened to just the name of the country, stuck as the name of the North American bird. However some people around the world don’t call them Turkeys. Here are some examples:

  • Across Arabia, they call it “diiq Hindi,” or the “Indian rooster.”
  • In Russia, it’s “Indjushka,” bird of India.
  • In Poland, “Inyczka”— again “bird from India.”

Last but not least, do the people in Turkey call it Turkey as well since it is named after their country?

The answer is…no.

Well, they call it “Hindi — again, short for India.

Although this large bird is named after the country Turkey, many turkeys have already been described from fossils.

The well-documented California Turkey Meleagris californica, became extinct recently enough to have been hunted by early human settlers and it is believed its demise was due to the combined pressures of climate change at the end of the last glacial period and hunting.

So, which Turkey is older?

The country or the big bird?

Read more at: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkey_(bird)

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=97541602

In Singapore, we call it ‘Turkey” in English but in Mandarin, it will be “huo ji” (火鸡), literally meaning ‘Fire Chicken’.

Don’t ask me why, I guess maybe it is because of its outlook??

Hope you all enjoy this post.

Till then, have a great weekend ahead!!

Cheers & TTFN~ 😀

 

A Bunch of Flowers To Cheer You Up!


Spring Bud

Sharing some inspiring flowers-related quotes:

” Count the garden by the flowers, never by the leaves that fall. Count your life with smiles and not the tears that roll. ”   Unknown

” May our heart’s garden of awakening bloom with hundreds of flowers.”   Thich Nhat Hanh

” What sunshine is to flowers, smiles are to humanity. These are but trifles, to be sure; but, scattered along lifes pathway, the good they do is inconceivable.”   Joseph Addison

Quotes Extracted  from : http://www.searchquotes.com

Hope you all will enjoy them.

Cheers & TTFN~

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