Posts tagged ‘history’

Trans-Cycle!


CNC-LN013 - VINTAGE INSPIRED PENNY FARTHING LONG NECKLACE

farthing was a coin of England, Great Britain, and finally of the United Kingdom, worth one quarter of a penny, 1/960 of a pound sterling.

Such coins were first minted in England in the 13th century, and continued to be used until 31 December 1960, when they ceased to be legal tender.

These old British Penny and Farthing (quarter penny) coins had inspired the name of the Penny-Farthing bicycle.

The penny-farthing (also known as High Wheel, High Wheeler and Ordinary), the first machine to be called ‘a bicycle’, is a term used to describe a type of bicycle with a large front wheel and a much smaller rear wheel, popular after the boneshaker, until the development of the safety bicycle, in the 1880s.

An important and unfortunate attribute of the penny-farthing is that the rider sits high and nearly over the front axle.  To stop, the rider presses back on the pedals while applying a spoon-shaped brake pressing the tire. When the wheel strikes rocks and ruts, or under hard braking, the rider can be pitched forward off the bicycle head-first, called “taking a header” or simply “a header”.

Two new developments changed this situation, and led to the rise of the Safety bicycle. The first was the chain drive, originally used on tricycles, allowing a gear ratio to be chosen independent of the wheel size. The second was the pneumatic bicycle tire, allowing smaller wheels to provide a smooth ride.

Although the trend was short-lived, the penny-farthing became a symbol of the late Victorian era. Its popularity also coincided with the birth of cycling as a sport.

Read more at

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farthing_(British_coin) 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penny-farthing

Coin 1:  P-E-N-N-Y!!!

Coin 2: F-A-R-T-H-I-N-G!!! 

Coin 1 & Coin 2: ~ T-R-A-N-S-F-O-R-M ~

*Poof*

Penny Farthing: We are the ‘TRANS-CYCLE’ !!! Yeah!

Have fun reading!

Till then,

Cheers & TTFN~ 😀

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(Reading) Your Happy List – Part 3


Happy List 11 - SageDoyleA big thank you to this lovely soul, Sagedoyle,  for sharing his happiness with us and with this last sharing received, we shall wrap up our ‘Happy List’ series at this moment.

If you lovely souls would like to share your happy list with us after reading this post, do feel free to fill up our comment box with all your happy lists so that we can share with all the lovely souls out there!

Related Links:

We would like to take this opportunity to thank Vijay @ HEM  and Sagedoyle and for sharing this lovely award with us on 5th Jan 2014 and 27th April 2014 respectively:

versatileblogger11[1]

These two lovely souls love reading and of course, writing, each having their own unique styles. Do free feel to pay them a visit and indulge yourselves in their writings.

Award Nominations Related Links:

ID-10094382
Talking about reading, DID YOU KNOW…

Reading is a large town and unitary authority area in the ceremonial county of Berkshire, England.

The name probably comes from the Readingas, an Anglo-Saxon tribe whose name means Reada’s People in Old English, or less probably the Celtic Rhydd-Inge, meaning Ford over the River.

By 1525, Reading was the largest town in Berkshire, and tax returns show that Reading was the 10th largest town in England when measured by taxable wealth.

The town continued to expand in the 20th century, annexing Caversham across the River Thames in Oxfordshire in 1911.

“Angry people are not always wise.” 

Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

CassandraAusten-JaneAusten(c.1810) hires.jpg

Portrait of Jane Austen, drawn by her sister Cassandra (c. 1810) – Wikipedia

Jane Austen attended Reading Ladies Boarding School, based in the Abbey Gateway, in 1784–86.

“Always forgive your enemies – nothing annoys them so much.”

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde Sarony.jpg

Photograph taken in 1882 by Napoleon Saron – Wikipedia

Oscar Wilde was imprisoned in Reading Gaol from 1895–97.

After his release, he lived in exile in France and wrote The Ballad of Reading Gaol, based on his experience of the execution of Charles Wooldridge, carried out in Reading Gaol whilst he was imprisoned there.

“Just because you’re offended, doesn’t mean you’re right.” 

Ricky Gervais

Ricky Gervais 2010.jpg

Gervais at Comedy Central’s “Night of Too Many Stars” in 2010 – Wikipedia

Ricky Gervais is from Reading.

He made the film Cemetery Junction, which, although filmed elsewhere in the UK, is set in 1970s Reading and is named after a busy junction in East Reading.

Read more @ Reading Berkshire – Wikipedia

Here’s another version of the song “Happy” to share with all you lovely souls out there before ending this post:

Have a wonderful day ahead and be happy, always!

Till then,

Cheers & TTFN~ 😀

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Let The Roses Rise (Part 2)


CNC-FSR002 - RUSTIC PETALS

As I don’t have any more rose design accessory at hand, I’ve upload the design ‘Rustic Petals’  instead. Before I continue with the next six months for the birthday flowers, I shall share with you some information concerning petals.

Flowers have long been a symbol of femininity and women. Flower petals can be used for this effect and they can show the beauty and innocence of youth, and the fleetingness of it.

These are the types of themes that flower petals can be used to emphasize:

  • The coming of spring.
  • Watching young girls fully bloom into womanhood.
  • A newly found love or romance.
  • A maturation of love.
  • Trying to capture such an event as it happens.

Lastly they can also show a loss of innocence for a girl.  This can be done through the flowers being broken or crushed, or by having broken flowers in the background after an event for the girl.

Rose petals are associated with the birth of the Indian goddess Lakshmi, claimed to be the most beautiful woman in India. She was supposedly born from 108 large and 1,008 small rose petals.

The number of petals on a rose have come to symbolize different things:

  • The wild rose has five petals, signifying the wounds of Christ.
  • A rose with seven petals signifies seven directions of space, seven degrees of perfection, and seven planets (when it was believed there were seven planets in the solar system).
  • A rose with eight petals is a message of rebirth and renewal.

Read more at:

http://www.three-musketeers.net/mike/flowers.html

http://www.ehow.com/about_6610717_symbolism-rose-petals.html

http://rosefarm.typepad.com/blog/2011/07/more-rose-number-symbolism-1.html

Without further adieu, here are the roses/item related for the next six months:

Crown of Roses (5th July)

The word Rosary means ‘Crown of Roses’ that is to say that every time people pray the Rosary devoutly they place a crown of 153 red roses and 16 white roses upon the heads of Jesus and Mary. Being heavenly flowers these roses will never fade or lose their exquisite beauty.

There are differing views on the history of the rosary.  According to tradition, the concept of the rosary was given to Saint Dominic in an apparition by the Virgin Mary in the year 1214 in the church of Prouille.

In the 15th century it was promoted by Alanus de Rupe (aka Alain de la Roche or Saint Alan of the Rock), a learned Dominican priest and theologian, who established the “15 rosary promises” and started many rosary confraternities.

However, most scholarly research suggests a more gradual and organic development of the rosary. From the 16th to the early 20th century, the structure of the rosary remained essentially unchanged.

Read more at:

 http://eternalcrownofroses.blogspot.sg/ 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosary

White Rose Bud (6th July), Red Rose Bud (7th July)

A rose bud is the bud of a rose (seriously…why do I want to type this out?) and literary a pretty young woman.

Rose petals and rosebud pieces are most commonly harvested while they are still buds in an adolescent growth stage. This preserves full flavor during the processing of the plant. Rosebud and rose petal tea has been used as a part of Chinese medicine for more than 4,000 years.

Read more at www.livestrong.com

White Rose (8th July)

White roses are the ultimate symbol of purity and innocence. There are plenty of myths and legends behind the white rose.

As one myth has it, the first rose on Earth was a white rose, and it miraculously transformed to other hues. The pure white rose was said to have been tainted by blood, making it red; and it was also made to blush from a kiss, making it pink.

Another myth came from the Ancient Greeks. It was said that roses were originally white until one day Aphrodite the Goddess of Love and Beauty pricked herself with the thorns of a rose. The blood that dripped from her finger turned the white roses red.

These myths indicate the loss of innocence, which is the absolute opposite of what the white rose symbolizes – innocence and purity.

Read more at Significance of  White Roses

Rosea Canina (9th July)

Rosa canina (commonly known as the dog rose) is a variable climbing wild rose species native to Europe, northwest Africa and western Asia.

The plant is high in certain antioxidants. The fruit is noted for its high vitamin C level and is used to make syrup, tea and marmalade. It has been grown or encouraged in the wild for the production of vitamin C, from its fruit (often as rose-hip syrup), especially during conditions of scarcity or during wartime.

The botanic name is derived from the common names ‘dog rose’ or similar in several European languages. It is sometimes considered that the word ‘dog’ has a disparaging meaning in this context, indicating ‘worthless’.

However it also known that it was used in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to treat the bite of rabid dogs, hence the name “dog rose” may result from this.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_canina

Burgundy rose (1st August)

The symbolic meaning of a burgundy rose is ‘unconscious beauty’.

The best answer selected in the answers.yahoo.com pertaining to the meaning of unconscious beauty –  beauty that is unrecognised by his/her owner,  it can also mean that sometimes you won’t recognize the beauty at first glance but you have to look a little deeper for it.

What should I do when there isn’t much information on the topic? I share a poem…hehehe…so here’s a poem ‘Unconscious Came a Beauty’ by May Swenson:

      Unconscious came a beauty

to my wrist and stopped my pencil

 merged its shadow profile with my hand’s ghost on the page

Red Spotted Purple or else Mourning Cloak

paired thin-as-paper wings, near black

were edged on the seam side poppy orange

  as were its spots

I sat arrested

for its soot-haired body’s worm shone in the sun

 It bent its tongue long as a leg

 black on my skin

and clung without my feeling

while its tomb-stained

duplicate parts of a window opened

And then I moved

Are you able to guess what insect is she describing? Do take a look at this page and let me know.

Damask Rose (2nd August)

The Damascus rose (Damask Rose), or sometimes as the Rose of Castile, is a rose hybrid, derived from Rosa gallica and Rosa moschata. Of the old European roses, the Damask is one of the most enchanting, the family of foliage and fragrance.

This family, with origins going back to pre-christian times probably originated in Persia, and was brought to Europe by the crusaders. By the 14th century the Damask rose had arrived in France, where it would have received considerable attention.

For centuries, the Damascus rose (Rosa damascena) has been considered a symbol of beauty and love. Today, the majority of our rose fragrance still comes from R. Damascena Trigintipetala, the Kazanlik rose. It is still grown extensively in Bulgaria.

You’ll need 3 tonnes of petals (1.2 million blooms) to distill 1kg of attar, the foundation of rose perfume. Worse still, you must harvest it in the short summer flowering season and then only in the early morning before the heat of the sun has diminished the fragrance.

Damascus roses are used in cooking as a flavouring ingredient or spice. Rose water is often sprinkled on many meat dishes, while rose powder is added to sauces. The most popular use, however, is in the flavoring of desserts such as ice cream, jam, Turkish delights, rice pudding, yogurt and etc.

Read more at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_damascena

http://www.netlist.co.nz/gardens/rosegarden/rgjulydamask.htm

Moss Rose (3rd August)

Moss Rose is a flowering plant in the family Portulacaceae, native to Argentina, southern Brazil, and Uruguay.  It is also seen in the South Asia and widely spread in most of the cities with old 18th-19th century architecture in the Balkans.

In Bangladesh, it is referred to as the “Time Flower” because the flower has a specific time to bloom while in Vietnam, it is also known as the “Ten o’clock flower”, because the flower is usually in full bloom at 10 o’clock in the morning.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moss-rose_Purslane

The Moss Rose is also a multi-purpose stadium in Macclesfield, England. It is currently used mostly for football matches and is the home ground of Macclesfield Town F.C.. The stadium holds 6,355 and was built in 1891, which until Macclesfield’s relegation in 2012 made it the second oldest in the Football League.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moss_Rose

Hundred-leaved Rose (5th August 2012)

The Hundred-Leaved Rose, also known as the Provence or Cabbage Rose is a complex hybrid rose developed by  Dutch rose breeders in the period between the 17th century and the 19th century, possibly earlier.

The flowers are round and globular, with numerous thin overlapping petals that are highly scented; they are usually pink, less often white to dark red-purple.

It is widely cultivated for its singular fragrance—clear and sweet, with light notes of honey. The flowers are commercially harvested for the production of rose oil, which is commonly used in perfumery.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_%C3%97_centifolia

Mundi Rose (12th September)

Rosa Mundi (Mundi Rose) was first described in 1583, and according to ‘The Garden Book’ of Sir Thomas Hanmer (published in Eng­land in 1659) it was originally found in Norfolk ‘..upon a branch of the common red rose…’ .

However there is an earlier legend which states that the ‘Rosa Mundi’ was named after Rosa­mund Clifford (also known as “The Rose of the World), a long-time mistress of King Henry II who reigned as England’s monarch from 1154 to 1189.

A large specimen of ‘Rosa Mundi’ is still a stunning sight in the height of summer and its semi-double flowers are among the largest of all the old fashioned roses.

It is the oldest of the all striped varieties grown today, and because of it natural disease resistance it has lasted well through the centuries.

Read more: http://gardenofeaden.blogspot.com/2009/04/historic-roses-rosa-mundi.html#ixzz26GHMftaY

Red Rose (13th September)

The primary significance of a red rose is love and romance; it not only carries more meaning than many other color roses, it is also one of the most universal of all symbols.

They have appeared throughout history and across many cultures as political and religious symbols. The mystique of the red rose has been a source of immeasurable inspiration for many throughout the ages.

The modern red rose we are now familiar with was introduced to Europe from China in the 1800’s. The color red itself evolved from an early primal symbol for life into a metaphor for deep emotion.

In Greek and Roman mythology the red rose was closely tied to the goddess of love. Many early cultures used red roses to decorate marriage ceremonies and they were often a part of traditional wedding attire. Through this practice, the red rose became known as a symbol for love and fidelity.

Red roses continue to be the most popular way to say “I love you” to someone special. The rich heritage of the red rose has culminated in its modern day image as the lover’s rose. They are the definitive symbol for romantic sentiments, representing true love, stronger than thorns.

Read more at http://www.proflowers.com/flowerguide/rosemeanings/redrose-meanings.aspx

China Rose (14th September)

The China Rose is an evergreen flowering shrubnative to East Asia. It is widely grown as an ornamental plant throughout the tropics and subtropics. The flowers are large, generally red in the original varieties, and firm, but generally lack any scent.

Despite their size and red hues attractive to nectar-feeding birds, they are not visited regularly by hummingbirds when grown in the Neotropics.

The flowers themselves are edible and are used in salads in the Pacific Islands. The flowers are used to shine shoes in parts of India.

It is also a pH indicator.China rose indicator turns acidic solutions to magenta/dark pink and basic solutions to green. It is also used for the worship of Devi and especially the red variety takes an important part in tantra.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_Hibiscus

Austrian Rose (19th September)

I cannot find any information about Austrian Rose, but one Austrian Copper Rose. Hmm…not sure if it is the same flower but here are some information on this flower.

Austrian copper rose (Rosa Foetida) is a species of rose, native to the foothills of the Caucasus Mountains in Georgia.

The rose is named for its smell–foetida is Latin for “having a bad smell” which is reminiscent of boiled linseed oil, a smell which some find objectionable

Since there were no yellow roses native to Europe, its introduction from Persia was an important addition to the cultivation of roses, and R. foetida is now an important contributor to the stock of cultivated roses.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_foetida

Rose Campion (20th September)

Rose Campion is a stunning combination of magenta blooms with a soft silverish foliage. It is considered a short-lived perennial that will grow well in Zones 3 to 9 in a sunny or lightly shaded location.

It’s been cultivated since the 1300’s, possibly earlier. In Catholic literature it is referred to as “Our Lady’s Rose”, possibly because of the heart shaped petals.

Rose Campion can be used as a cut flower if you harvest the stems when just one or two of the flowers are open. They will last about a week in a vase.

Read more at http://oldfashionedliving.com/campion.html

Rose Acacia (15th October)

Rose Acacia is a plant many people are unfamiliar with and are asking what it is.  Other common names for Rose Acacia include hairy or bristly locust. This is because the stems are covered with soft bristles. It can set multiple clusters of flowers on each stem resulting in an extended bloom time.

The flowers are pink, produced on short racemes of 3-12 together in the spring; each flower is 20–25 mm (about 1 inch) across. It is an easy to grow plant because of its tolerance to poor soil and drought. Often it is seen growing on old farmsteads or along the roadside.

The plant habit is somewhat open and airy because of coarse stems and its compound leaves. Young shoots can easily be pulled if one is persistent, but if cultivated it is best to place it in a confined area or area where it can be permitted to spread.

Read more at http://blog.lib.umn.edu/efans/ygnews/2009/07/rose_acacia_-_a_shrub_with_sho.html

Guelder Rose (29th October)

Guelder Rose is a species of Viburnum, native to Europe and Asia. The name Guelder comes from Gueldersland, a Dutch province, where the tree was first cultivated.

It was introduced into England under the name of ‘Gueldres Rose.’ The garden variety, Viburnum sterile, with snowball flowers, does not produce the showy fruit of the wild species.

The leaves are superficially similar to the leaves of some maples, most easily distinguished by their somewhat wrinkled surface with impressed leaf venation.

The berries have anti-scorbutic properties. They turn black in drying and have been used for making ink. It can be edible in small quantities, with a very acidic taste; it can be used to make jelly. It is however very mildly toxic, and may cause vomiting or diarrhea if eaten in large amounts

The wood, like that of the Spindle Tree and Dogwood, is used for making skewers.

Read more at

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viburnum_opulus

http://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/g/gueros44.html

Daily Rose (4th December)

Aww…this is a difficult one. 😦

Been searching around and all I’ve found is a blog with this name and an album with this name in year 2004 by Stefanie Schlesinger.

I was not able to find the song clip for ‘Daily Rose’ in YouTube. The second song in this album is ‘My Funny Valentine’, which is not available in YouTube as well.

Since rose is closely related to valentine, I’ve decided  to share a piano piece having the same name with you all:

Hope you will enjoy this piece as much as I do. 😀

Lancaster’s Red Rose (5th December)

The final rose of the year

Lancaster’s Red Rose (also known as Old Red Damask and Rose of Provins) was introduced officially in Europe during the XIII century, brought from Persia; but was probably in Europe before that, since it shows up in ancient Roman frescoes.

The rose grew wild throughout Central Asia and can be found nowadays in the wild around Morocco, Andalusia, the Middle East and the Caucasus. These roses are shrubs and are also included on what is referred as old garden roses (OGR), Heritage or Antiques.

The Red Rose was the symbol of Lancastrian supporters who opposed the rival House of York, whose symbol was the White Rose of York. Both houses were branches of the Plantagenet royal house, tracing their descent from King Edward III (1312 – 1377).

The rivalry between the factions identified by the White Rose of York and the Red Rose of Lancaster started in 1399 when King Richard II (1377-1399) was overthrown by his cousin, Henry Bolingbroke, the Duke of Lancaster.

From the nineteenth century the red rose was part of the badge of a number of units of the British Army recruiting in the county. The rose was also appreciated for its medical value and was utilized in countless medical remedies.

Read more at

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Rose_of_Lancaster

http://www.the-tudors.org.uk/red-rose-lancaster.htm

Roses are red

Violets are blue

Sugar is sweet and so are you 

May all sweet and lovely souls out there enjoy reading these lovely and rosy information.

Till then,

Cheers & TTFN~ 😀

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Shake Your Bon-Bon…


CNC-LN021-MAJESTIC-PEACOCK

Found this YouTube clip while searching for more information concerning peacocks and find it interesting.

Folk dance, called “Mayilattam” or “the peacock dance” is a very popular dance, where the artistes dress up like peacocks and imitate the dance of the peacock.

The Peacock Dance is the most famous dance in Dai Minority area – Yunnan province, China. In Dai people’s heart, peacock is the symbol of beauty, happiness and luck. Of all kinds of dance of Dai Minority, the peacock dance is their favourite one.

Here are the features of the Peacock Dance:

  • The dancers’ knees always wave flexibly.
  • The movements are soft and elegant to show the docility of peacocks.
  • The performers’ legs move promptly and the eyes move flexibly to show the flexibility of the peacock.

Read more at http://www.chinaodysseytours.com/special-topic-about-china/peacock-dance-of-dai-minority.html

The Pailin Peacock Dance is a dance of Kola ethnic group, who live in the region of Pailin in the west of Cambodia.  The dance relates to a Pailinian legend about a magic peacock who goes to preach to the King.

This lively dance is about commemorating this peacock which is a symbol of happiness.

The dance imitates the peacock with lively colors of beautiful wings, and suggests a courting scene between a peacock and a peahen.

The dance is said to bring happiness and prosperity to villagers, and is often performed during the New Year and ritual ceremonies in times of drought to pray for rain.

Read more at http://www.cambodiancommunityday.org/index.php/attractions/pailin/phnom-yat

A confused peahen (female peacock): Why are you dancing? 

Peacock Dancer: Why can’t I dance?

The confused peahen (female peacock): I can’t marry you.

Peacock Dancer: …..

Have fun reading!

Till then,

Cheers & TTFN~ 😀

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Turtle vs Hare – Far Side


Try to be like the turtle – at ease in your own shell.
~ Bill Copeland

CNC-ST001 - TURTLE SHELF PRINT STACK

The famous story of the ‘The Tortoise and the Hare’ is often used as a constant reminder for being persistent in achieving our goals and not being over complacent.

I’ve come across another version by Lord Dunsany, a prolific Irish author who is considered by many to be one of the major influences on fantasy and horror fiction of the 20th century, and finds it so ironic that once again I cannot help but to share. So here’s his version:

THE TRUE HISTORY OF THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE

For a long time there was doubt with acrimony among the beasts as to whether the Hare or the Tortoise could run the swifter. Some said the Hare was the swifter of the two because he had such long ears, and others said the Tortoise was the swifter because anyone whose shell was so hard as that should be able to run hard too. And lo, the forces of estrangement and disorder perpetually postponed a decisive contest.

But when there was nearly war among the beasts, at last an arrangement was come to and it was decided that the Hare and the Tortoise should run a race of five hundred yards so that all should see who was right.

“Ridiculous nonsense!” said the Hare, and it was all his backers could do to get him to run.

“The contest is most welcome to me,” said the Tortoise, “I shall not shirk it.”

O, how his backers cheered.

Feeling ran high on the day of the race; the goose rushed at the fox and nearly pecked him. Both sides spoke loudly of the approaching victory up to the very moment of the race.

“I am absolutely confident of success,” said the Tortoise. But the Hare said nothing, he looked bored and cross.

Some of his supporters deserted him then and went to the other side, who were loudly cheering the Tortoise’s inspiriting words. But many remained with the Hare.

“We shall not be disappointed in him,” they said. “A beast with such long ears is bound to win.”

“Run hard,” said the supporters of the Tortoise and  “run hard” became a kind of catch-phrase which everybody repeated to one another.

“Hardshell and hard living. That’s what the country wants. Run hard,” they said. And these words were never uttered but multitudes cheered from their hearts.

Then they were off, and suddenly there was a hush. The Hare dashed off for about a hundred yards, then he looked round to see where his rival was.

“It is rather absurd,” he said, “to race with a Tortoise.” And he sat down and scratched himself.

“Run hard! Run hard!” shouted some.

“Let him rest,” shouted others and “let him rest” became a catch-phrase too.

And after a while his rival drew near to him.

“There comes that damned Tortoise,” said the Hare, and he got up and ran as hard as could be so that he should not let the Tortoise beat him.

“Those ears will win,” said his friends. “Those ears will win and establish upon an incontestable footing the truth of what we have said.”

Some of them turned to the backers of the Tortoise and said, “What about your beast now?”

“Run hard,” they replied. “Run hard.”

The Hare ran on for nearly three hundred yards, nearly in fact as far as the winning-post, when it suddenly struck him what a fool he looked running races with a Tortoise who was nowhere in sight, and he sat down again and scratched.

“Run hard. Run hard,” said the crowd.

“Whatever is the use of it?” said the Hare, and this time he stopped for good.

Some say he slept. There was desperate excitement for an hour or two, and then the Tortoise won.

“Run hard. Run hard,” shouted his backers. “Hard shell and hard living: that’s what has done it.” Then they asked the Tortoise what his achievement signified, and he went and asked the Turtle.

The Turtle said, “It is a glorious victory for the forces of swiftness.”

The Tortoise repeated it to his friends. And all the beasts said nothing else for years and even to this day, “a glorious victory for the forces of swiftness” is a catch-phrase in the house of the snail.

The reason that THIS VERSION of the race is not widely known is that very few of those that witnessed it survived the great forest-fire that happened shortly after which came up over the Weald by night with a great wind.

The Hare, the Tortoise and a very few of the beasts saw it far off from a high bare hill that was at the edge of the trees, and they hurriedly called a meeting to decide what messenger they should send to warn the beasts in the forest.

THEY SENT THE TORTOISE.

~ The End ~

Read more at  http://thenostalgialeague.com/olmag/dunsany1.html

This is so funny! Can’t help but to share. 

Have fun reading!

Cheers & TTFN~ 😀

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A Colour Of Pure Sunlight, Be That Spark…


The colour ORANGE is named after the appearance of the ripe ORANGE FRUIT.

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WAIT!!! WAIT!! WAIT!!!

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DON’T GO YET!!

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Okay…the above orange isn’t the exact orange that we are going to talk about in this post.

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The colour orange is named after the appearance of the ripe orange fruit.

Before the late 15th century, the colour orange existed in Europe, but without the name; it was simply called yellow-red.

Spanish and Portuguese merchants brought the first orange trees to Europe from Asia in the late 15th and early 16th century, along with the sanskrit name “naranga,” which gradually became “orange” in English.

In parts of Germany, the Netherlands, and Russia, the orange fruit was and is still called the Chinese apple.

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Orange became an important colour for all the impressionist painters. They all had studied the recent books on colour theory, and they know that orange placed next to azure blue made both colours much brighter.

The post-impressionists went even further with orange. Paul Gauguin used oranges as backgrounds, for clothing and skin colour, to fill his pictures with light and exoticism.

But no other painter used orange so often and dramatically as Vincent van Gogh who had shared a house with Gauguin in Arles for a time.

For Van Gogh, orange and yellow were the pure sunlight of Provence. 

Read More @ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orange_(colour)

6MAR2014 - From Within

The colour ORANGE happens to be the favourite colour of this lovely soul, Yuna @ Little Orange World and if you’ve visited her lovely blog, it wouldn’t take you too long to guess what her favourite colour is.

DID YOU KNOW THAT…

Before the 18th century, carrots from Asia were usually purple, while those in Europe were either white or red.

Dutch farmers bred a variety that was orange; according to some sources, as a tribute to the King of the Netherlands, William of Orange.

The long orange Dutch carrot, first described in 1721, is the ancestor of the orange horn carrot, one of the most common types found in supermarkets today. It takes its name from the town of Hoorn, in the Netherlands.

Information Extracted From: Wikipedia

Once again, a big thank you to Yuna for sharing her favourite colour with us and thus making this post possible.

My favourite colour is blue.

What is your favourite colour?

Do drop us a comment if you lovely souls out there would like to share with us your favourite colours.

Before signing off,

If those carrots can do, so can we!

Do BE THAT SPARK

and give someone who is in need of

A BIG ORANGE CARROT HUG

at this moment!

Have you lovely souls already done so?

Great!!

Till then,

Cheers & TTFN~ 😀

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From Chewing To Biting


CNC-LN016-JUST-A-BULLET

 BITE THE BULLET 

MEANING

(The Free Dictionary by Farlex)

 To accept something difficult and try to live with it. 

ORIGIN(S)

The theory goes that patients undergoing surgery would be given a stick of wood or a pad of leather to bite on in order to divert their attention away from the pain and also to protect against biting their own tongues.

An ingenious correspondent has suggested that, as wooden sticks are known as billets, the stick-biting practice might have first been called ‘biting the billet’ which then modified to ‘biting the bullet’.

Another theory goes that before the days of effective anesthetics, soldiers who fight in the America Civil war were given bullets to bite on to help them enduring pain.

This seems rather improbable, as effective anesthesia using ether and chloroform was introduced in 1846/47 and ether was issued to U.S. military surgeons as early as 1849 – well before the US Civil War began in 1861.

‘Biting the bullet’ does in fact date from before that war, as this definition of ‘nightingale’ in Francis Grose’s A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, 1796 makes clear:

15042013 - Chew A Bullet

The figurative usage of ‘bite the bullet’, just meaning ‘show courage; display a stiff upper lip’ is appropriately Victorian. The phrase was first recorded by Rudyard Kipling in his 1891 novel The Light that Failed:

15042013 - Bite On The Bullet

By 1926, the phrase had left the gory battlefields of the Boer War far behind and moved into the drawing rooms of the English upper classes, in the voice of Bertie Wooster, speaking to Jeeves in The Inimitable Jeeves, 1923:

15042013 - Bite The Bullet

In philosophy, a more specific meaning of the phrase is to accept unpleasant consequences of one’s assumed beliefs.

Given a philosopher’s currently held beliefs that he or she is not prepared to give up, he or she may have to bite the bullet by accepting a particular claim offered as an extreme case or putative counterexample.

Read more at: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/bite-the-bullet.html

There is no success without hardship. ~ Sophocles

Last but not least, would like to share another classic song with you lovely souls out there!

Do have a marvelous day ahead!

Till then,

Cheers & TTFN~

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Handcraft Jewelry BannerCredits: Some Pictures used in this post are downloaded from FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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