CNC-LN022-OUTDOOR-CAFE

And the idea of

Just wandering off to a cafe

With a notebook and writing and seeing where that takes me for a while

Is just bliss

~ J. K. Rowling

The most common English spelling, café, is the French, Portuguese and Spanish spelling, and was adopted by English-speaking countries in the late 19th century. The Italian spelling, caffè, is also sometimes used in English.

In the 17th century, coffee appeared for the first time in Europe outside the Ottoman Empire, and coffeehouses were established and quickly became popular.

When coffee was first introduced into England in the late 1600s, it was largely drunk by men only, and in coffeehouses rather than at home.

The banning of women from coffeehouses was not universal, but does appear to have been common in Europe. In Germany women frequented them, but in England and France they were banned.

In 1674 a group of London women put out “The Women’s Petition Against Coffee.” This group of London women suggested that, by spending too much time in coffeehouses, men were becoming, in a word, effeminate. As these women so eloquently put it, “never did Men wear greater breeches, or carry less in them.”

Cafes may have an outdoor section (terrace, pavement or sidewalk cafe) with seats, tables and parasols. This is especially the case with European cafes.

Cafes offer a more open public space compared to many of the traditional pubs they have replaced, which were more male dominated with a focus on drinking alcohol.

Read more at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffeehouse

http://www.thejanedough.com/women-banned-from-drinking-coffee/

http://www.gopetition.com/famous-petitions-in-history/232/the-women-s-petition-against-coffee-1674.html

09042013 - Coffee Is

What A Coffee Lover Would Say…

Ethiopian ancestors of today’s Oromo people were believed to have been the first to recognize the energizing effect of the coffee plant.

Though no direct evidence has been found indicating where in Africa coffee grew or who among the natives might have used it as a stimulant or even known about it, earlier than the 17th century.

The earliest credible evidence of either coffee drinking or knowledge of the coffee tree appears in the middle of the 15th century, in the Sufi monasteries around Mokha in Yemen.

The first coffee smuggled out of the Middle East was by Sufi Baba Budan from Yemen to India in 1670.The first plants grown from these smuggled seeds were planted in Mysore.

It was in Arabia that coffee seeds were first roasted and brewed, in a similar way to how it is now prepared.

In 1583, Leonhard Rauwolf, a German physician, gave this description of coffee after returning from a ten-year trip to the Near East:

09042013 - Coffee Description

Coffee became more widely accepted after it was deemed a Christian beverage by Pope Clement VIII in 1600, despite appeals to ban the “Muslim drink.” The first European coffee house opened in Italy in 1645.

Read More at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffee

09042013 - A Cup of Tea

What A Tea Lover Would Say…

Tea is the most popular manufactured drink in the world in terms of consumption. Its consumption equals all other manufactured drinks in the world – including coffee, chocolate, soft drinks, and alcohol – put together.

Although there are tales of tea’s first use as a beverage, no one is sure of its exact origins. The first recorded drinking of tea is in China, with the earliest records of tea consumption dating to the 10th century BC.

Tea likely originated in China during the Shang Dynasty as a medicinal drink and was already a common drink during the Qin Dynasty (third century BC). It became widely popular during the Tang Dynasty, when it was spread to Korea, Japan and Vietnam.

Tea was first introduced to Portuguese priests and merchants in China during the 16th century, at which time it was termed chá.

Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, took the tea habit to Great Britain around 1660, but tea was not widely consumed in Britain until the 19th century.

In Ireland, tea had become an everyday beverage for all levels of society by the late 19th century, but it was first consumed as a luxury item on special occasions, such as religious festivals, wakes, and domestic work gatherings such as quilting.

The addition of milk to tea in Europe was first mentioned in 1680 by the epistolist Madame de Sévigné.

Many teas are traditionally drunk with milk in cultures where dairy products are consumed but a 2007 study published in the European Heart Journal found certain beneficial effects of tea may be lost through the addition of milk

Many flavourings are added to varieties of tea during processing. Among the best known are Chinese jasmine tea, with jasmine oil or flowers, the spices in Indian masala chai, and Earl Grey tea, which contains oil of bergamot.

The flavour of the tea can also be altered by pouring it from different heights, resulting in varying degrees of aeration.

The art of high-altitude pouring is used principally by people in Northern Africa but also in West Africa and can positively alter the flavour of the tea, but it is more likely a technique to cool the beverage destined to be consumed immediately

Photo credit: mymalaysiablog.wordpress.com

In Southeast Asia, particularly in Singapore and Malaysia, the practice of pouring tea from a height has been refined further using black tea to which condensed milk is added, poured from a height from one cup to another several times in alternating fashion and in quick succession, to create a tea with entrapped air bubbles creating a frothy “head” in the cup.

This beverage, teh tarik, literally, “pulled tea” (which has its origin as a hot Indian tea beverage), has a creamier taste than flat milk tea and is extremely popular in the region.

Tea pouring in Malaysia has been further developed into an art form in which a dance is done by people pouring tea from one container to another, which in any case takes skill and precision.

Read More at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea

I’ve yet taken my dose of coffee for today and so, off to water boiling once I hit the ‘publish’ button.

Are you a coffee or tea lover?

Why not share with us your love by leaving us a lovely comment?

Till then,

Have a great day ahead, always!

Cheers & TTFN~ 😀

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